Marin report outlines last year’s achievements, next year’s goals

02/08/2018

Marin County released its annual state of the county report last week, detailing highlights from last year while outlining supervisors’ five main goals for 2018. “We know that not everybody can get to our meetings or is glued to marincounty.org,” Brent Ainsworth, media specialist for the county, said. “This report lets us pause to stop and talk about the county’s priorities.” Supervisors’ five key goals for 2018 are fiscal responsibility, “housing first,” equity, road quality and climate change. The county plans to close a projected $5 million gap in the upcoming budget by asking its employees to consider pension reduction options. The county is adopting a “housing first” approach to homelessness, which seeks to minimize the problem by prioritizing the creation of homes over factors like employment and sobriety, and will further implement the 2017 Racial Equity Action Plan to slow down the rate of income disparity and increase health and life expectancy. To diversify its staff, the county is also tailoring programs to boost accessibility and marketing open positions to a wider range of job candidates. The Department of Public Works will adapt to a “complete streets” approach to better serve pedestrians and cyclists while leveraging local funds to match state and federal grants; the department hopes to come up with $20 million for the county’s 420 miles of roads and 151 bridges. To combat climate change, the county has added 7 electric vehicles to its fleet, bringing the total to 80, installed LED lighting on city streets, installed over a megawatt of solar power on county buildings and launched a compost program at the civic center. A few selected highlights from 2017 include that Marin remained the second healthiest county in the state (behind San Mateo) and the addition of Naloxone (a drug that reverses opioid overdoses) to public safety agencies. There were 1,678 new marriage licenses, 3,395 emergency calls, 1,892 agricultural inspections and 7,596 new youth library cards.